How to Print & Assemble a PDF Pattern – LAURA SEW ALONG

Hi BEAUTIES! I hope you are doing fabulous! I promised a tutorial for the LAURA pattern and rather than split it up into several blog posts I decided to keep it all in one easily accessible place. The pattern itself is very beginner friendly and could definitely be made in less than an hour! 🙂 The printing and sewing tutorial are below along with style photos at the end. Enjoy and have a fabulous rest of the week! XO

Don’t have the Laura pattern yet? Get your copy HERE.

 PRINTING THE PATTERN

Open your 1001 LAURA Print at Home File in Adobe Acrobat Reader. You will see a layers menu on the left side, this is where you can check or uncheck the boxes to select your desired size(s). Make sure you have only your desired size(s) selected otherwise all sizes will print. You can see our sizing chart, HERE.

 

On the print menu make sure you have the scale setting to 100% or the pattern will be sized incorrectly. Print page one of your pattern and measure the “Test Square”. If the square measures correctly you can print the rest of the pages.

PATTERN ASSEMBLY

Once you have all your pages printed out you can place them on a hard flat surface and begin assembly. The only supplies you need for this are tape & paper scissors.

Cut on the border lines of one side of the paper, tape it together side by side to the opposite sheet. The pages are numbered in faint gray letters as well to help you ensure you have the correct sequence/pages in order.

Make sure you have your Diamond shape flush side by side and that your numbers are corresponding to the opposite sheet. You will continue doing this for your entire pattern until you have completed all 24 pages. Once the pattern is assembled you can cut your size or trace a size as desired.

SEWING

*All seams have a 1/2″ (1.3 cm) seam allowance*

Once you have the pattern cut out of fabric, make a snip at the center front and center back neckline area at the fold. This will mark the center front and center back points and make it easier to attach the neckband later in sewing.

When you open your fabric you will have a snip evenly made at the center point. 

Place the front over the back with right sides together and pin at the shoulder seams.

Sew the shoulder seam using a straight or stretch stitch depending on your preference (I used a straight stitch here).

Make sure you backstitch at the beginning and end of your seams. This prevents your seams from unraveling and falling apart.

Press your seam towards the back.

Sew the neckband with right sides together along the short ends and press the seam open. Then, place the neckband onto itself with WRONG sides together and press it flat. Make a small snip at the center front on the neckband.

Pin the neckband seam to the center back snip with right sides together. Pin the center front snip of the neckband to the center front snip on the shirt, with right sides together.

Ease the neckline into to the neckband. The neckband on knit fabrics are made smaller than the neckline in order to have the neckband lay flat on the body. You will have to stretch the neckband slightly to accommodate the neckline.

Continue pinning around the entire neckline.

Sew the neckband with a stretch/zig zag stitch. I use a 3.5 width and a 3.0 length.

Sew around the entire neckline with a stretch/zig zag stitch. Make sure you do not have any puckers or tucks.

Press the seam down away from the neckband.

On the right side of the fabric you can choose to topstitch close to seam. This will help the neckband to lay even flatter to the body.

Lay your front and back with right sides up and place the sleeve right side down. Pin the center notch of the sleeve to the shoulder seam of the shirt or dress.

Continue pinning matching the corresponding front and back notches.

Sew the sleeve to the front/back armseye with a stretch stitch.

Example stitch above.

 

Place the front to back right sides together and pin along the entire side seam and sleeve. Have the seam of your sleeve facing towards the sleeve. Sew with a straight or stretch stitch.

For the hems, I like to use a basting stitch 1/2″ from the raw edge to act as a guide for turning in the sleeve and lower hem. A basting stitch is an easily removable stitch, usually the longest length stitch available on your machine.

Example basting stitch above. Turn the hem in to the wrong side using the stitching line as your guide and press. For the round hem it is a good idea to use pins to keep the hem from shifting while sewing.

Sew all your hems in place using a straight or stretch stitch. Press neatly and you’re all finished!

STYLE

Get the LAURA pattern, and share your makes with us! We want to see! XO

#RPlauratop #RPlauradress #rosypenapatterns INSTAGRAM: @rosypenapatterns

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3 thoughts on “How to Print & Assemble a PDF Pattern – LAURA SEW ALONG

    1. Hi Sherrie! Yes I’m going to have a “How-to Print & Assemble a PDF Pattern” video up today and a sew-along video coming soon as well! XO

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